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In Paise of Sweets (poems, songs & quotations)

Sweet Poems

Stolen sweets are always sweeter;
Stolen kisses much completer;
Stolen looks are nice in chapels;
Stolen, stolen be your apples.

James Leigh Hunt, [Fairies' Song , 1830]


The following two poems which are particular favourites are taken from 'A First Poetry Book' compiled by John Foster and published by Oxford University Press


Sweet Song by Vernon Scanell

This is the sweet song,
Song of all the sweets,
Caramel and butterscotch
Bullseyes, raspberry treats;

Treacle toffee, acid drops,
Pastilles, crystal fruits,
Bubble-gum and licorice-sticks
As black as new gum boots;

Peppermint creams and aniseed balls,
Tiny sweets and whoppers,
Dolly-mixtures, chocolate drops,
Gigantic gob-stoppers;

Lemon sherberts, jelly babies,
Chocolate cream and flake,
Nougat, fudge and such as give
You tooth and belly-ache.


Toffee-Slab by Brian Lee

As thick as a plank, as unbending as Fate,
It was wrapped in wax-paper, and weighed like a slate;
It had a brown cow on it, smiling and fat
With 'rich' and 'creamy' and grand words like that:
And you broke it with bricks on Mrs Doig's wall,
So it came out irregular, but with something for all
(If you were quick, it was more or less fair
Even wee Andy had his proportional share);

Then with nobody speaking, with sort of fixed grins
And oozings like glue leaking over our chins
We'd stand there for ages, our eyes staring wide,
The great splinters of it jammed tightly inside,

With the sharpest end stuck up near your brain,
What pleasure!- mingled with twinges of pain.


Something sweet to sing

SWEETS FOR MY SWEET - The Searchers

(Pomus / Shuman)

Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
Your first sweet kiss thrilled me so
Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
I'll never ever let you go

If you wanted that star that shines so brightly
To match the stardust in your eye
Darling, I would chase that bright star nightly
And try to steal it from the sky
And I would bring

Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
Your first sweet kiss thrilled me so
Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
I'll never ever let you go

If you wanted a king to keep you smilin'
I'd tell the sandman you were blue
And I'd ask him to keep that sand a-pilin'
Until your dreams had all come true
And I would bring

Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
Your first sweet kiss thrilled me so
Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
I'll never ever let you go

And if you wanted a love to last forever
Darlin' I would send my love your way
And my love'd not only last forever
But forever and a day
And I would bring

Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
Your first sweet kiss thrilled me so
Sweets for my sweet, sugar for my honey
I'll never ever let you go


Sweet Quotations

Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
Groucho Marx

AUTHOR: Charles Lamb (1775-1834)
QUOTATION: The pilasters reaching down were adorned with a glistering substance (I know not what) under glass (as it seemed), resembling-a homely fancy, but I judged it to be sugar-candy; yet to my raised imagination, divested of its homelier qualities, it appeared a glorified candy.
ATTRIBUTION: My First Play.

QUOTATION: Sweets to the sweet: farewell!
ATTRIBUTION: Hamlet. Act v. Sc. 1.

AUTHOR: John Milton (1608-1674)
QUOTATION: A wilderness of sweets.
ATTRIBUTION: Paradise Lost. Book v. Line 294.

AUTHOR: Colley Cibber (1671-1757)
QUOTATION: Stolen sweets are best.
ATTRIBUTION: The Rival Fools. Act i.

QUOTATION: Lovely enchanting language, sugar-cane,
Honey of roses, wither wilt thou fly?
ATTRIBUTION: George Herbert (1593-1633), British poet.
The Complete English Poems [George Herbert]. John Tobin, ed. (1991) Penguin Books.

Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.
ATTRIBUTION: Richard Sherman, songwriter, Robert Sherman, songwriter, and Clarence Brown. A Spoonful of Sugar (song), in Mary Poppins (film musical) (1964).

Sweet spring, full of sweet days and roses,
A box where sweets compacted lie;
My music shows ye have your closes,
And all must die.
ATTRIBUTION: George Herbert (1593-1633), British poet, clergyman. repr. In The Works of George Herbert, ed. Helen Gardner (1961). Virtue, st. 3, The Temple (1633).

QUOTATION: At Joe's Eats
You get your fish or chicken on meat platters.
With coleslaw, macaroni, candied sweets,
Coffee and apple pie. You go out full.
(The end is-isn't it?-all that really matters.)
ATTRIBUTION: Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. "The Sundays of Satin-Legs Smith.

QUOTATION: More are men's ends marked than their lives before.
The setting sun, and music at the close,
As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last,
Writ in remembrance more than things long past.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. John of Gaunt, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 1, l. 11-4.

QUOTATION: Think of sweet and chocolate,
Left to folly or to fate,
Whom the higher gods forgot,
Whom the lower gods berate;
Physical and underfed
Fancying on the featherbed ...
ATTRIBUTION: Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. "The Anniad."

QUOTATION: Venice is like eating an entire box of chocolate liqueurs at one go.
ATTRIBUTION: Truman Capote (1924-1984), U.S. author. quoted in Observer (London, Nov. 26, 1961).